Cupboard Under The Stairs.
#1
DISCLAIMER:  
The author of this thread makes no claims with regard to the efficiency (or lack thereof) of this approach to accordion repair.  The reader must therefore judge the efficacy of this method using his/her common sense.  No accordions were harmed during this research.
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My Chanson developed a duff key on the treble side of the instrument.  This happened just before Brenda became ill, so circumstances dictated that I put the Chanson to one side.  During those first few difficult months, I had very little time for my accordions, though my Galotta and my Arietta were working fine.

Due to lack of space in our cosy little cottage, the poor old Chanson went into the cupboard under the stairs, where it has languished since about last August.  Brenda decided to do a bit of spring cleaning yesterday, so asked me to move the Chanson while she attacked the under stair space with a mop and brush.  

Having not seen the Chanson for so many months, I was naturally curious to see if the problem had gotten any worse.  Imagine my excitement and delight when I discovered that the previously duff key was working as well as it ever did.  

Someone, I have no doubt, will respond to this thread with a scientific explanation as to why the Chanson is now working properly when it previously wasn't, but I think it is all because of a metaphysical entity which lives under our stairs.  

Anyway, I will be using my Chanson much more now that I have repaired it by omission.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#2
One should not underestimate the efficacy and curative value of spending quiet time in a darkened room ...
Please do not make personal comments except via the personal message facility.
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#3
The gods of the hearth clearly need a workshop. In your case the understairs cupboard. It may be that they worked their wonders via differing degrees of temperature and humidity therein.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#4
it's either leprechauns or strict quarantine that can cause this
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#5
Maybe the sprite of humidity or lack thereof but how magic is that?
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#6
(25-03-2020, 03:48 PM)Tom Wrote: Maybe the sprite of humidity or lack thereof but how magic is that?

Removal men broke the admittedly flimsy factory case on my Maugein Mini Sonora and the accordion was left sliding around the van/truck, half in and half out of the case. 

It had been in storage for 6 weeks prior to that in an unheated warehouse.

It is my pride and joy, and surprisingly appeared to be none the worse for its ordeal. I decided I'd best check the other three. 

My 70 year old Marinucci had been playing up a bit prior to the move (as had my 66 year old wife). 

Much to my surprise 6 weeks in an unheated container seemed to cure a lot of it's issues and it is now behaving itself again. Main problems were a sticky reed and dodgy valves. 

I'm working on persuading my wife to spend a similar period in an unheated container. It probably won't do her any good at all, but I would be willing to pay twice the storage costs!
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#7
UPDATE:

Since writing the original post in this thread, Brenda, myself and the Chanson have been out on one of our adventures. We chose (as we always do) to visit a place known for its bucolic scenery, where I played for an hour or so.

The Chanson was faultless (unlike myself) and we had a lovely time out in the wilds. This Arcadian lifestyle suits a couple of old crocks like us, and it seems to suit the Chanson very well.

We have already chosen today's venue, and will be setting out directly after lunch. Today's destination is only about eight miles from home, and is noted for its pastoral beauty. As the weather here is so lovely, I expect to see more people than I normally would. There could be as many as four or five people walking around the area, though this would be unusual.

It would be misleading to describe the track we will be driving along as a road, though parts of it are paved. The potholes are linked by threads of tarmac in places, but much of the track is suitable only for the agricultural vehicles which normally frequent it. All that said, it is possible to negotiate this rustic artery, just as long as care is taken not to ground your car. It would be madness to exceed 10 mph anywhere on this track, and some parts require you to drive below walking speed.

It is all worth it in the end, as I get to play my Chanson as loud and for as long as I like.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#8
Thanks Stephen. Sounds like a wonderful occasion. Can you send pictures some time?
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#9
Hi Tom,

We know quite a few out of the way places, all of which are incredibly beautiful. I don't know what inspires other people, but our hearts are always lifted when we visit isolated rural locations. (which is almost every day)

In the words of an old song: "All the lights on Broadway don't amount to an acre of green." Others may disagree with this sentiment, but Brenda & I appear to have some fundamental need for beautiful scenery.

Though I readily confess that my musical talent has its limitations, I am absolutely certain that I play sweeter music when I am immersed in pastoral tranquility. Everything just sounds better and feels better when I am in my natural element.

As to photographs, I'm afraid that I must disappoint you. I would love to post some pictures, but my technical ability is that of a man in his seventies. I hope you will understand and forgive my lack of computer savvy ....... I was born and raised in very different times.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#10
Stephen,
There is no doubt that a trip to an isolated rural location is your best medicine. We’re lucky here to live in one. The entire state of Montana, about the size of Germany, but with only a million people, has just received a “shelter in place” order in the face of the covid19 pandemic. We are confined to our homes except for necessary trips to get groceries or medicine. The exception is that we can go outdoors, to the surrounding hiking trails, mountains, lakes, plains, and rivers. Our Governor is a good man who understands the importance of the wild.
As a professional musician, the loss of income from cancelled concerts is cause for concern. But maybe more important is the loss of live music, something that comforts and lifts people up. We are left with recordings. But putting what some of my friends are calling “music of comfort” out in the world is a task to which we can all rise. I have no doubt, Stephen, that the 4 or 5 people who may have heard you play, no matter what you think of your musical limitations, felt their spirits lifted in the same way you and Brenda did.
The same “metaphysical entity” that healed your accordion in the cupboard under the stairs might be the same one that heals a world that is really hurting now. We can all do our part. Stay well.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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#11
Risking a £60 fine... it's all dog eat dog these days Smile

Wanna buy a Roland?
Check yer email sometime
(Graham)
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#12
Sorry to hear that, Eddy. We're likewise confined, and I am doing it out of caution for myself and my family anyway. Unlike you and many others, my gigs are all volunteer but I know that I and my listeners surely miss the live music. Hang in there!
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#13
(27-03-2020, 05:09 PM)Tom Wrote: Sorry to hear that, Eddy.  We're likewise confined, and I am doing it out of caution for myself and my family anyway.  Unlike you and many others, my gigs are all volunteer but I know that I and my listeners surely miss the live music.  Hang in there!

Double back atcha!
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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#14
Hi Eddy,

Just like our esteemed friend, Tom, my gigs are entirely voluntary. It just so happens that we have already stepped back from these voluntary engagements because of Brenda's recent illness, so we see the new regulations merely as an extension to the necessary limitations placed on us by Brenda's condition.

Montana sounds like the kind of place which suits people like Brenda & I. We are fortunate enough to live on the edge of a town, which allows us to be in the countryside within a few minutes of leaving home. It certainly isn't on the same scale as Montana, but what we have is truly beautiful.

Precautionary measures are now coming in thick and fast, with new rules and advice being transmitted on every news bulletin. It seems that every shop is now imposing restrictions on the number of people being allowed inside at any one time, which is causing queues outside many local stores. Known for their goodhearted forbearance and humorous nature, the good people of Lancashire seem to be taking it all in their stride.

Another trait of we Lancastrians is that we kiss and hug each other a lot. Apart from our partners, this display of affection is temporarily suspended. Difficult times for demonstrative people !!!

I hope that all our members can manage to avoid coronavirus, and that their wonky instruments heal themselves in a cupboard under the stairs.

Good Luck & Stay Safe,

Stephen.
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#15
I wish the best of luck to you, Stephen and especially to Brenda.
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#16
Hi Tom,

I return your kind wishes with interest, and hope that you and all your family manage to avoid this dreadful pandemic.

News broadcasts have been getting steadily worse over here, and the bulletins from your side of the pond seem even less cheery. Wherever in the World our members are, I hope they keep safe and well.

The major urban conurbations (London & New York especially) appear to be the real hot-spots, which is another good reason to get out into the countryside. (with or without an accordion.)

Kind Best Wishes,

Stephen.
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#17
(29-03-2020, 10:42 AM)Stephen Hawkins Wrote: Hi Tom,

I return your kind wishes with interest, and hope that you and all your family manage to avoid this dreadful pandemic.  

News broadcasts have been getting steadily worse over here, and the bulletins from your side of the pond seem even less cheery.  Wherever in the World our members are, I hope they keep safe and well.

The major urban conurbations (London & New York especially)  appear to be the real hot-spots, which is another good reason to get out into the countryside.  (with or without an accordion.)

Kind Best Wishes,

Stephen.

Stephen,

Obeying the rules and staying at home in an effort to keep safe. 

Just saw somebody's "blow away" plastic greenhouse whizz over my garden into the recreation area behind it, at an alarming rate. Fortunately nobody was in it at the time, and I wasn't in the garden! 

I'm hoping that the persistent winds here will blow the virus away. Current wind speed is supposed to be 23kph, but that must be when it drops!

We're getting a lot of new cases here, but I suppose we are perhaps one of the lesser known urban conurbations, globally. 


We're just short of 6 million people in an area that is 400 times smaller than Montana, which only has a population of about a million. To be fair it's warmer here at this time of year, but only if we all snuggle up to each other, out of the wind!  

We'll never know what Montana looks like, as Margo is not allowed to fly outside of Europe. Looks as though it is freezing in winter and scorching hot in the summer. Remember when we had that here, before all the icebergs in the Arctic started melting? 

Stay safe, everybody. Move to Antarctica, and hope electric cars get cheap enough to buy, as it's a long swim back!
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#18
Hi John,

Funnily enough, I have just this minute emailed you.

We have large conurbations about 20 miles East & 20 miles West of us, but we haven't been to either of them in more years than I can count. Those places aren't for us.

The wind you describe is also howling around our neck of the woods, which is rather cramping my style. We may get out for a little drive later, but I won't hold my breath.

Must go now .......... Crumpets for lunch.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#19
(29-03-2020, 11:48 AM)Stephen Hawkins Wrote: Hi John,

Funnily enough, I have just this minute emailed you.

We have large conurbations about 20 miles East & 20 miles West of us, but we haven't been to either of them in more years than I can count.  Those places aren't for us.

The wind you describe is also howling around our neck of the woods, which is rather cramping my style.  We may get out for a little drive later, but I won't hold my breath.

Must go now .......... Crumpets for lunch.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.

Stephen,

Closest we ever get to Birmingham City Centre is the QE Hospital in Selly Oak. In 25 years of coming here regularly and now living in Birmingham, I've been in the city centre three times. It's just not worth the grief sitting in traffic, and wasting half a day trying to find somewhere to park. Taxi to and from the city is about £30 (if you're lucky and the driver doesn't try and rip you off), so it would need to be a special case indeed to justify that. I don't like travelling on the buses in case I get mugged, or worse, die during the journey. Scheduled journey time for the 10 mile trip to the city is about an hour (and a day). They're introducing a scheme to ban cars from the city centre later this year, but we don't know where all the extra buses they need will come from. The train service is a joke, and there is nowhere to park at Longbridge Station in any case. 

Apart from that we love it here! Nice countryside on the doorstep (when you're allowed to go there).  

Enjoy your lunch. We're having bread and cheese. I can see the local supermarket from my back garden, but there's no way I'm standing in a queue for 20 minutes just to get in the door, in the hope that they might have something so exotic as a crumpet.  

Cheers,

Your major conurbation dwelling buddy (serves us right for moving here).
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#20
Yum....crumpets! What’s a crumpet?
Montana IS freezing in the winter, but it keeps the riffraff out. Or that’s what people say. I say there’s as high a percentage of riffraff here as anywhere. However, it has some of the best skiing ⛷ in the world. My youngest son is a skiing instructor.
Summers are very pleasant, as long as the whole place isn’t on fire, something we’re more likely to see unless....well, you know, I’m obeying the stricture against talking politics.
Right now, Spring, we’re as likely to see snow as we are 60 degrees and blue skies. 2 days ago I was out on the river catching big rainbow trout on a size 22 Parachute Adams...and thanks to our English brethren for the great tradition of fly fishing.
Okay we’ve gotten a bit far from the Accordion Under the Stairs, but that’s one comforting thing about being under quarantine. Another is the Quarantini, which my wife Patty and I have been making. It’s just like a martini, except that you drink it at home, alone.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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