making accordion repair parts
#1
Nothing really special, I just found a video demo with a simple apparatus to cut some material for repairing accordion parts.
For some precision cutting.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HY1W_t0-0gI  
Akkordeonreparatur, Universelle Schneidevorrichtung, Kappmaschine
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#2
looks handy

and a relaxing video
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#3
(02-12-2019, 12:22 AM)Stephen Wrote: Nothing really special, I just found a video demo with a simple apparatus to cut some material for repairing accordion parts.
For some precision cutting.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HY1W_t0-0gI  
Akkordeonreparatur, Universelle Schneidevorrichtung, Kappmaschine

Looks nice indeed. But when I need cutting I either use scissors or else a "guillotine" paper cutter. That's something many people likely already have in their (home) office.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#4
It's a handy device. 
If he could replace the 6 screws (to fixate the sliders)  by sprocking-wheels that can be clicked, he could win some more time. 

Now he has to loosen the screws each time he wants to change the centimeters or millimeters.
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#5
This is almost essential for cutting layered valves. I found that it is difficult to cut them with scissors or a table cutter as the layers want to slide around on each other and the the result is not consistent (this explains all the clamps). I do not have to make valves very often but I have to cut and then assemble them. This would be nice for cutting pads too but I pretty much have that worked out.
Smythe's Accordion Center, since 1997
Oakland ,California
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#6
(10-01-2020, 06:36 PM)kimric Wrote: This is almost essential for cutting layered valves. I found that it is difficult to cut them with scissors or a table cutter as the layers want to slide around on each other and the the result is not consistent (this explains all the clamps). I do not have to make valves very often but I have to cut and then assemble them. This would be nice for cutting pads too but I pretty much have that worked out.

I have never cut through multiple layers so far. I have layered (plastic) valves in many different sizes, so if a valve is a bit too long I cut a bit from the (loose) end of the bottom layer, and in a few cases also a few mm from the end of a second layer. What I use most are leather valves which are only a single layer. I wouldn't want to cut from the other end because that's where the layers are glued together.
I have never considered making my own valves from different layers of plastic, and also not considered cutting through multiple layers as needed to make a valve narrower. With so many different sizes of valves being available, why would you consider making your own valves that require assembling layers?
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#7
(10-01-2020, 07:16 PM)debra Wrote:
(10-01-2020, 06:36 PM)kimric Wrote: This is almost essential for cutting layered valves. I found that it is difficult to cut them with scissors or a table cutter as the layers want to slide around on each other and the the result is not consistent (this explains all the clamps). I do not have to make valves very often but I have to cut and then assemble them. This would be nice for cutting pads too but I pretty much have that worked out.

I have never cut through multiple layers so far. I have layered (plastic) valves in many different sizes, so if a valve is a bit too long I cut a bit from the (loose) end of the bottom layer, and in a few cases also a few mm from the end of a second layer. What I use most are leather valves which are only a single layer. I wouldn't want to cut from the other end because that's where the layers are glued together.
I have never considered making my own valves from different layers of plastic, and also not considered cutting through multiple layers as needed to make a valve narrower. With so many different sizes of valves being available, why would you consider making your own valves that require assembling layers?

I work on 100+ year old accordions that have weird valve sizes. A vintage Guerrini (San Francisco made!) had 63 mm valves. The largest I had was 55mm. It was a full rebuild and I needed 24 of them.
Smythe's Accordion Center, since 1997
Oakland ,California
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#8
I watched the whole video and I don’t even repair accordions.
To see a whole YouTube video without someone yelling and with no inane background music is rare. Just the sound of metal on wood, of adjusting a well made and appropriate piece of simple technology was satisfying and enough. Almost made me want to start repairing accordions. Almost.
Beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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#9
(11-01-2020, 06:50 PM)kimric Wrote: I work on 100+ year old accordions that have weird valve sizes. A vintage Guerrini (San Francisco made!) had 63 mm valves. The largest I had was 55mm. It was a full rebuild and I needed 24 of them.

I see... getting the right size can be a bit of an issue, but so far I managed to find valves of the right width and sufficient length in my stockpile (of new valves). I have many sizes to cover both Italian accordions and Russian bayans (which have wider reeds and thus wider valves). The longest leathers in my collection are 85mm, which I believe are the longest that Carini carries. (Carini in Castelfidardo has an amazing selection of accordion parts.) In smaller sizes you also need valves of the same size but different thickness or stiffness of leather. With plastic valves it's easier.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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