CBA Beginner Books - Palmer Hughes?
#1
Hi everybody.

I recently bought a CBA System C, it will arrive in a couple of weeks - I'm very excited!

I also have coming:

1-10 Palmer Hughes
8 or so Palmer Hughes accessory books

Does anyone have any easy, fun accordion song book reccomendations?
Would the "Easy Book Three cord Fake Book" or the "Easy Book Disney Fake Book" be appropriate?


I understand that Palmer Hughes is not intended for the button accordion, should I order the Luigi Oreste Anzaghi book? I have heard that it is very dry, and difficult to learn from; Or will I be able to use the PH books?

Thanks!

Also searching for a CBA C System Skype instructor! (Canadian here.)
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#2
The Palmer Hughes books are for piano accordions. They have no instruction or fingering for CBA of any description. I have used Anzaghi, Maugein, and the newly published Galliano books. Maugein is in French, the other two are available in English. As a Canadian you should be able to manage both.

The styles of all three are very different, but on trying the fingering, which differs between the books substantially, I found Anzaghi’s most effective for me. YMMV. If you can read French easily then I’d recommend you buy a copy of De L’Accordéon by Frédéric Deschamps. It’s not so much a tutor as a guide to position and techniques, mainly for the right hand.

Good luck with your search for a tutor. I am learning from a tutor who plays b-griff and piano accordion. Obviously I’m on my own for right hand fingering, but I play diatonic accordion, so I’m already familiar with the basics of playing a button keyboard. It was the stradella bass and the very different bellows technique which I most needed help with.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#3
Thank you!

I just order the Galliano book as well as the Anzaghi.
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#4
Do a search on this site for "Lars Holm". His books are available at Lars Holm Books 1&2. I expect shipment costs outside of Europe to be around 30 EU.
I want to play the accordion badly – and I do.
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#5
You can also contact one of the following accordionists and teachers, and ask them what CBA method books they use.

http://www.modernaccordionperspectives.c...rmers.html  

http://www.modernaccordionperspectives.c...it_is.html

We could post a list on this forum, showing the CBA method books these teachers recommend for CBA study.
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#6
I think you will find the Lars Holm books are for MIII or 'Freebass' and so of limited use for a Stradella player?

This might be helpful for basic fingering with the PH books
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIw0aVo8...N8wAChNvjz
Richard
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#7
Thank you for all the suggestions! I feel prepared for the arrival of my accordion!

One more question - is this the largest / most active CBA / Accordion community online?
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#8
(31-10-2019, 10:28 PM)willclimbs Wrote: Thank you for all the suggestions! I feel prepared for the arrival of my accordion!

One more question - is this the largest / most active CBA / Accordion community online?

Will,

The answer is yes, although the CBA accordion has always played second fiddle to the PA in English speaking countries. 

Only countries where C system CBA is more popular than PA are France, Portugal, and maybe Switzerland. C system CBA is fairly big in Denmark and Sweden, but PA is also popular in those countries. Most popular accordion in Finland is also C system, but they have their own version of it, with C in the third rather than the first row.

B system CBA is the most common type of accordion in Norway, Russia, and Serbia. Maybe also in some countries that were part of the former USSR, but not all of them. 

B system CBA is also popular in Belgium and The Netherlands, and in a very few areas of Northern France.

With regard to your studies, CBA fingering is definitely not an exact science. By all means use the fingering advocated in your chosen method, but don't be afraid to experiment once you get some confidence. The CBA keyboard offers tremendous scope for individuality if you can resist the temptation to want to sound like any particular player. 

There are/were a few CBA accordion forums in France, but they have never had the membership numbers that you'll find on here. Naturally, most members on this forum are PA players, but some of them at least have more than a passing interest in CBA.
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#9
Will, even if you don't read those languages, you can always use Google Translate. I've been doing that to good effect with a German CBA method, Elsbeth Moser's "Das Knopfakkordeon C-Griff. It gets a little tedious typing it all in, but I found it still added a lot to the material over just understanding the pictures and diagrams.

Good Luck!
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#10
(01-11-2019, 09:55 PM)WilliamKErickson Wrote: Will, even if you don't read those languages, you can always use Google Translate. I've been doing that to good effect with a German CBA method, Elsbeth Moser's "Das Knopfakkordeon C-Griff. It gets a little tedious typing it all in, but I found it still added a lot to the material over just understanding the pictures and diagrams.

Good Luck!

True. I'm hoping that the recently published Galliano book (2018) is sufficient to guide my learning process! If I need backup I'll have Anzhagi's + the PH set. But again, hoping for the Galliano book to be great! Fingers crossed.
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#11
The Galliano book is generally well thought of. It's sometimes criticised for being a bit demanding - try to have additional stuff for extra practice to avoid frustration: the PH books should do the trick.
Richard
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#12
(02-11-2019, 02:14 PM)dunlustin Wrote: The Galliano book is generally well thought of. It's sometimes criticised for being a bit demanding - try to have additional stuff for extra practice to avoid frustration: the PH books should do the trick.

Noted. Thank's!
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#13
I don't know the cba system yet, but you can find many accordion teachers who teach via Skype at super professor.com. There
is a woman from I believe Edmonton who is Russian and because of her background she may teach cba-but I'm not sure.
I was thinking of studying with a really interesting teacher in Greece. I found her on preply.com. She plays cba but she also
plays piano and she has a master's degree in accordion playing from London, England. On her site their is a video of her explaining the different things she teaches and she seems great. She also a schedule on her site for the coming week so you
can see if you can find a time which matches her schedule. I think her name is Lo. She is the only teacher for accordion on preply. If you go to Superprof. there are many teachers from all over the world. Many of them are quite expensive-some as much
as 100.00 US. for a one hour Skype lesson which I think is crazy. There is a very talented fellow on Super Prof named Stefan
Nestroski. He plays piano but he many know button. He is in Macedonia and he says his English is very strong. His fee is as
low as one can find-again the prices are all listed on the teacher's sites and you can email them and ask them any questions you
may have. Sergiu Popa also teaches Skype from Montreal-he's a phenomenal player, runs an accordion school in Montreal
and he plays piano but he might also know button. He used to charge 50.00 an hour for Skype but that was two years ago.
But if you want to go the Skype route-definitely look into Superprof. There are no hidden fees and you don't have to lock in for
lessons and I think almost all of the teachers give you the first lesson free which is a standard procedure. Ideally I think having
a live teacher is the best route-but they aren't easy to find. Good luck and keep us posted! Your journey is very exciting.

Will-I think Lo on preply might be the best person to try to start with. I have emailed her several times over the years, she
gets back promptly, her English, at least in email is perfect (she seems to have many languages) and she plays really nicely and
seems to have a great attitude. I think she charges 30.00 U.S. an hour and she told me you can take lessons as frequently as you want. She is now a cba player and she seems to have a great attitude. you get a really good sense of her through her video.
When you look her up on preply you see the hours in Canadian time of her teaching availability.
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#14
Noted the above post from Alan with interest. 

Skype lessons are one solution, if you can afford them, although I'm told that there can be a slight delay from when the tutor plays before you actually hear the notes. In the early days that may not be much of a problem, but faster passages might become an issue. I have no experience of Skype lessons, but had considered them, and that's what the tutor advised me. 

With regard to CBA methods for C system, it must be borne in mind that CBA has never really caught on in most of the world, although it is the most popular type of accordion in one or two European countries and regions. Over the years many books have been written that were dedicated to C system CBA, but most of those are no longer in print.  

So what is the best method? The answer is you won't know until you find one that seems to work for you. In the old days students were forbidden to use their thumbs on CBA, and in the opinion of most players who did use their thumbs, such players were very restricted in their ability, such as here:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tnkUo32zIo&t=39s

No shoulder straps, no thumb, no problem! You only really need 4 fingers to play a CBA. Which 4 is up to you!

Best advice I can offer you is try and stick to one method book or you'll end up all over the place in a world of endless confusion over whether you are doing things "properly". Wolmer Beltrami in the clip just flew in the face of convention and let the method books work for other people. 

Good luck!
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#15
(04-11-2019, 10:48 PM)Alans Wrote: I don't know the cba system yet, but you can find many accordion teachers who teach via Skype at super professor.com. There
is a woman from I believe Edmonton who is Russian and because of her background she may teach cba-but I'm not sure.
I was thinking of studying with a really interesting teacher in Greece. I found her on preply.com. She plays cba but she also
plays piano and she has a master's degree in accordion playing from London, England. On her site their is a video of her explaining the different things she teaches and she seems great. She also a schedule on her site for the coming week so you
can see if you can find a time which matches her schedule. I think her name is Lo. She is the only teacher for accordion on preply. If you go to Superprof. there are many teachers from all over the world. Many of them are quite expensive-some as much
as 100.00 US. for a one hour Skype lesson which I think is crazy. There is a very talented fellow on Super Prof named Stefan
Nestroski. He plays piano but he many know button. He is in Macedonia and he says his English is very strong. His fee is as
low as one can find-again the prices are all listed on the teacher's sites and you can email them and ask them any questions you
may have. Sergiu Popa also teaches Skype from Montreal-he's a phenomenal player, runs an accordion school in Montreal
and he plays piano but he might also know button. He used to charge 50.00 an hour for Skype but that was two years ago.
But if you want to go the Skype route-definitely look into Superprof. There are no hidden fees and you don't have to lock in for
lessons and I think almost all of the teachers give you the first lesson free which is a standard procedure. Ideally I think having
a live teacher is the best route-but they aren't easy to find. Good luck and keep us posted! Your journey is very exciting.

Will-I think Lo on preply might be the best person to try to start with. I have emailed her several times over the years, she
gets back promptly, her English, at least in email is perfect (she seems to have many languages) and she plays really nicely and
seems to have a great attitude. I think she charges 30.00 U.S. an hour and she told me you can take lessons as frequently as you want. She is now a cba player and she seems to have a great attitude. you get a really good sense of her through her video.
When you look her up on preply you see the hours in Canadian time of her teaching availability.

Hi Alans,
Thank's a lot for your response!
I have searched and found Lo, and she looks very promising! I will most certainly try a couple of lessons with her!
Thank you! I will keep you posted! My accordion should arrive in a week or two!

Will

(05-11-2019, 09:39 AM)maugein96 Wrote: Noted the above post from Alan with interest. 

Skype lessons are one solution, if you can afford them, although I'm told that there can be a slight delay from when the tutor plays before you actually hear the notes. In the early days that may not be much of a problem, but faster passages might become an issue. I have no experience of Skype lessons, but had considered them, and that's what the tutor advised me. 

With regard to CBA methods for C system, it must be borne in mind that CBA has never really caught on in most of the world, although it is the most popular type of accordion in one or two European countries and regions. Over the years many books have been written that were dedicated to C system CBA, but most of those are no longer in print.  

So what is the best method? The answer is you won't know until you find one that seems to work for you. In the old days students were forbidden to use their thumbs on CBA, and in the opinion of most players who did use their thumbs, such players were very restricted in their ability, such as here:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tnkUo32zIo&t=39s

No shoulder straps, no thumb, no problem! You only really need 4 fingers to play a CBA. Which 4 is up to you!

Best advice I can offer you is try and stick to one method book or you'll end up all over the place in a world of endless confusion over whether you are doing things "properly". Wolmer Beltrami in the clip just flew in the face of convention and let the method books work for other people. 

Good luck!

Thank's for the tips!
Definitely plan on sticking with Galliano for fingerings while getting started, and just going slow and steady with that book + some skype lessons!
Understandable how utilizing too many resources with varied techniques being taught would be confusing and inhibit progress!

Will
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#16
(05-11-2019, 10:33 AM)Thank\s for the tips! Wrote: Definitely plan on sticking with Galliano for fingerings while getting started, and just going slow and steady with that book + some skype lessons!
Understandable how utilizing too many resources with varied techniques being taught would be confusing and inhibit progress!

Will

Will,

I mentioned which four fingers you used were up to you. In Joe Rossi's case a German soldier made that decision for him during WW2, when he shot off the third finger of Joe's right hand. 

He had surgery to remove the stump and eventually resumed his career as a pro player. Not sure if he wrote any method books, but if you find one I know a surgeon who could sort your extra finger for you! 

Even although he lost that third finger he doesn't make as much use of his thumb as you would imagine. His first name is pronounced as "Joey". 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJSLaZlADic
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#17
John,
Thanks for the links! Informative and entertaining, as always! Smile
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#18
I’m very surprised to hear that piano accordion is more popular world wide than Cba. Whenever I look at you tube videos, and I almost only watch classical renditions,all of the Europeans are playing Cba at least in the east where it seems most of the masters are today.

Skype is not my first choice,but as I mentioned earlier I live in the largest city in Canada and there are three teachers in the city. One teaches at a school and is booked solid,another lives halfway to the moon and I don’t own a car, and the third-extremely qualified and assessable costs considerably more than a Skype teacher. I’m going to try Skype,all my life I have studied other instruments and I would never consider anything but a teacher sitting beside me. Sometimes a teacher has to reach over and place your hand properly on the instrument. I just think charging 100.00 us to teach from your living room via Skype is ls obscene.
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#19
(06-11-2019, 04:13 AM)Alans Wrote: I’m very surprised to hear that piano accordion is more popular world wide than Cba....

Why surprised? Huh
Check out:
Which has the most active teachers?
Which the most commercially available tutoring material in print or second hand?
Which the most printed music, new or used?
Which the widest choice of instruments new or used?
Which the still active repair people?
Smile
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#20
(06-11-2019, 05:38 AM)Dingo40 Wrote:
(06-11-2019, 04:13 AM)Alans Wrote: I’m very surprised to hear that piano accordion is more popular world wide than Cba....

Alan,

The preferred instrument for classical music in Europe is indeed the CBA bayan type of instrument, with free bass, and if you are used to watching You Tube videos of that type of music then that's what you'll usually see and hear. The majority (but by no means all) of the players will be either Russian or from countries that were formerly part of the USSR, and are dedicated to the classical repertoire. The bayan is not quite the same as a CBA accordion, and those of a technical mind could explain the subtle differences. Classical music conservatories exist in many European countries, and small numbers of students graduate on both PA and CBA free bass accordions, depending on the requirements of the conservatory. Some only allow CBA, but others are flexible.

Here in the UK the accordion in any shape or form wasn't recognised as a musical instrument suitable for classical study until 1984, by which time a good few of us were mature adults. I don't know what percentage of UK accordionists have studied at conservatory level, but my guess is that it won't be very high at all. The ratio of classical vs popular enthusiasts has probably increased in modern times, but the accordion is still struggling in the popularity stakes (except among members on forums such as this one). 
 
All that aside, the PA has always been the most common type of accordion worldwide, and it would seem that nothing is about to change that. 

For the record I've never played a PA, or any type of piano keyboard in my life, and I am one of those who wish there was more of a selection of better quality CBA instruments here in the UK. Many of those for sale here are cheap imports or antiquities requiring major work. If you ask for a "button accordion" here they'll usually think you're after a 2 row diatonic.I would imagine you will be facing more or less the same situation in Canada. At one time most major UK towns and cities had dedicated accordion stores. They would typically be floor to ceiling with every kind of PA known to man. If you were lucky you might find a battered CBA that seven or eight players had tried their hand at, and given up because they couldn't find a teacher. If you wanted anything decent you had to order it "blind" from the dealer, and wait up to a year to own it. For most people keen to get started that just wasn't a worthwhile proposition, and they just bought a PA.
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