Girl from Ipanema
#1
Testing me new Boss 01s drum machine...like it more than a metronome for sure
whttps://youtu.be/4RN-XpAZRFw
Off now till New Year to study some R & B, Boogie Woogie and Rhythm and Blues over the winter....Best make use of these dark evenings....
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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#2
Lookin good!
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#3
(04-10-2019, 01:44 PM)Tom Wrote: Lookin good!

Hi Terry,

Well done!

I don't have the patience to set up drum machines and/or backing tracks. I find that tune a bit of a handful on the accordion, but it's a whole lot easier on guitar.
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#4
cool!

and a good timng exercise
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#5
Cheers lads... Yep Jozz is on the button.... I bought the boss dr01s purely as a less tedious metronome... And John its well worth considering... No heavy programming involved.. All preset patterns and you just switch on or off whatever percussion you wish to keep your timings
Wish id bought years ago rather that just nurturing a love/hate relationship with the cruel mistress that is madam metronome
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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#6
(07-10-2019, 09:42 AM)losthobos Wrote: Cheers lads... Yep Jozz is on the button.... I bought the boss dr01s purely as a less tedious metronome... And John its well worth considering... No heavy programming involved.. All preset patterns and you just switch on or off whatever percussion you wish to keep your timings
Wish id bought years ago rather that just nurturing a love/hate relationship with the cruel mistress that is madam metronome

Terry,

My wife bought me a metronome some time ago, and it's looking good on top of a chest of drawers in what serves as my music room. 

Vox used to make little guitar amps with built in rhythms and I went to buy one a good few years back. The shop had sold out and the salesman said as a pure aside "They're pretty crap anyway".

We're hoping to move south to Brum in the near future, as my wife has had enough of combing straw out of her hair. Selling houses in this part of Scotland comes with a health warning, as it usually takes a very long time, and the music bit is difficult. When we finally swap our Scottish castle and country estate for a three bed terrace in Brum I might get back on track, "awroight!"

Tara a bit!
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#7
(07-10-2019, 09:51 PM)maugein96 Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 09:42 AM)losthobos Wrote: Cheers lads... Yep Jozz is on the button.... I bought the boss dr01s purely as a less tedious metronome... And John its well worth considering... No heavy programming involved.. All preset patterns and you just switch on or off whatever percussion you wish to keep your timings
Wish id bought years ago rather that just nurturing a love/hate relationship with the cruel mistress that is madam metronome

Terry,

My wife bought me a metronome some time ago, and it's looking good on top of a chest of drawers in what serves as my music room. 

Vox used to make little guitar amps with built in rhythms and I went to buy one a good few years back. The shop had sold out and the salesman said as a pure aside "They're pretty crap anyway".

We're hoping to move south to Brum in the near future, as my wife has had enough of combing straw out of her hair. Selling houses in this part of Scotland comes with a health warning, as it usually takes a very long time, and the music bit is difficult. When we finally swap our Scottish castle and country estate for a three bed terrace in Brum I might get back on track, "awroight!"

Tara a bit!

Bostin’!
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#8
Bostin’!

Chris,

I've got most of the West Midlands patois under my belt, but it took me quite a while to realise there were several "Birmingham" accents, most of which aren't from Birmingham at all. 

We have a similar issue in Glasgow, but it does all tend to sound the same to "foreigners".
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#9
Born and bred in Brum.

You’re right, the accents in that part of the world vary subtly from place to place. A well-tuned ear can distinguish several varieties. It’s over fifty years since I lived there, so things have probably changed a bit. I remember a pure Birmingham accent which could sound rather harsh in some mouths, but in others, particularly young men and women with soft high voices it could be alluring. It does vary across the city.

Among the town’s and villages around Walsall and Dudley the accent is Black Country. Much more definite, with archaic usages such as ‘thee’ and ‘thou’ only recently abandoned and still in use by some. As I remember it, speakers would refer to their home as the Bla-Coontrye. Sir Lenny Henry grew up in Dudley (Doodlye) and traces of the accent may be heard in his speech.

Coventry has a different accent too. There are some echoes of the South in their speech. Although I think that may well have increased over the last half century what with the prevalence of Thames Estuarine noises on the broadcast media lately.

Which part of Brum are you moving to, and more importantly, why?
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#10
So, for the rest of us, “Brum” = Birmingham? Huh
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#11
(09-10-2019, 07:05 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: So, for the rest of us, “Brum” = Birmingham? Huh
Is that a district of Ipanema... ?
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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#12
(08-10-2019, 10:13 PM)Chrisrayner Wrote: Born and bred in Brum.

Which part of Brum are you moving to, and more importantly, why?

Chris,

It's quite a long story, but my wife lived in Rubery for 8 years before I met her 24 years ago, and has kept in touch with several friends she knew while she lived there with her first husband. They had moved there from Edinburgh due to his employment, but the marriage failed, and she moved back north to be nearer her family.  

We have been down there many times over the years, and decided that we would like to live there after we retired. Both of us have lived in various cities, so urban life is nothing new to us. The difference in the respective property markets has been a major obstacle, but we are now in a position to move. 

It will most likely be to B45 (Rubery or Rednal) or B31 (Longbridge rather than Northfield), as that's where most of my wife's friends live. Anything affluent is completely out of our reach. 

The property market in this part of Scotland (Hawick, Scottish Borders), is pretty dire, due to the perpetual decline of the woollen industry, and it's just a case of waiting for a buyer. Fortunately we live in one of the more desirable areas, otherwise we could be dug in for a very long time. It appears we are reasonably close to a sale at the moment, and we are ever hopeful. 

Many people cannot quite work out why people of our age living in a rural area would want to retire to a city. We just tell them there are too many sheep to count here, and you end up awake all night!

(09-10-2019, 07:05 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: So, for the rest of us, “Brum” = Birmingham? Huh

Dingo,

"Brum" and, less commonly, "Brummagem" are two nicknames for Birmingham. Of course if you Google Birmingham you will automatically be taken to Birmingham, Alabama, so the original is probably less famous than the US version. 

I was speaking to a cousin from the US some time ago and asked her if she had ever been to Paris. Her immediate reaction was to enquire "Do you mean Paris, France?" To we Europeans there is only one Paris, as very few of us will know there is a place called Paris in Texas.

She asked me if I had ever been to Moscow, and I told her I'd been many times. She asked me about prices and I told her they were exactly the same as here in Hawick. Her jaw dropped slightly and I had to break it to her that the Moscow I was speaking about was a village in Ayrshire, Scotland.

If they can do it, so can we!
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#13
John, something to help you to blend in. When you get there? Smile


Or this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nL5BBU5AVEk

(As far as the accent goes in these clips, I quite like it!)

Personally, I find the accent quite comprehensible. It must be the effect of all the British serials I’ve watched over the years. Smile
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#14
(09-10-2019, 08:49 AM)OO’maugein96 Wrote:
(08-10-2019, 10:13 PM)Chrisrayner Wrote: Born and bred in Brum.

Which part of Brum are you moving to, and more importantly, why?

Chris,

It's quite a long story, but my wife lived in Rubery for 8 years before I met her 24 years ago, and has kept in touch with several friends she knew while she lived there with her first husband. They had moved there from Edinburgh due to his employment, but the marriage failed, and she moved back north to be nearer her family.  

We have been down there many times over the years, and decided that we would like to live there after we retired. Both of us have lived in various cities, so urban life is nothing new to us. The difference in the respective property markets has been a major obstacle, but we are now in a position to move. 

It will most likely be to B45 (Rubery or Rednal) or B31 (Longbridge rather than Northfield), as that's where most of my wife's friends live. Anything affluent is completely out of our reach. 

The property market in this part of Scotland (Hawick, Scottish Borders), is pretty dire, due to the perpetual decline of the woollen industry, and it's just a case of waiting for a buyer. Fortunately we live in one of the more desirable areas, otherwise we could be dug in for a very long time. It appears we are reasonably close to a sale at the moment, and we are ever hopeful. 

Many people cannot quite work out why people of our age living in a rural area would want to retire to a city. We just tell them there are too many sheep to count here, and you end up awake all night!

Ah!  I was born in the Queen Elizabeth and lived most of my childhood in Kings Norton.  My mother was a GP in Kings Norton and she had many patients in Northfield, quite a few of whom worked at the Austin in Longbridge.  Sadly this is no more, the site is now largely occupied by an out of town shopping centre with its associated car parks.

My dad was an engineering director with Joseph Lucas at Great King St.  Another bit of British manufacturing history.  For some reason my mother thought he needed a business to occupy his spare time, so while he was away for a time in the sixties she bought a laundrette in Rubery.  Bloody mad.  

Even so, he continued to run it as a part time business for several years.
I was back that way earlier this year when I bought my first CBA from Fairdeal Accordions in Longbridge.  If you fetch up there then you should meet the chap who runs it.  He’s a nice bloke, retired, but still occupied with his accordion trading business and a dance band in the style of schlager bier Keller music.  He has a website which you could google.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#15
(09-10-2019, 09:52 AM)Chrisrayner Wrote:
(09-10-2019, 08:49 AM)OO’maugein96 Wrote:
(08-10-2019, 10:13 PM)Chrisrayner Wrote: Born and bred in Brum.

Which part of Brum are you moving to, and more importantly, why?

Chris,

It's quite a long story, but my wife lived in Rubery for 8 years before I met her 24 years ago, and has kept in touch with several friends she knew while she lived there with her first husband. They had moved there from Edinburgh due to his employment, but the marriage failed, and she moved back north to be nearer her family.  

We have been down there many times over the years, and decided that we would like to live there after we retired. Both of us have lived in various cities, so urban life is nothing new to us. The difference in the respective property markets has been a major obstacle, but we are now in a position to move. 

It will most likely be to B45 (Rubery or Rednal) or B31 (Longbridge rather than Northfield), as that's where most of my wife's friends live. Anything affluent is completely out of our reach. 

The property market in this part of Scotland (Hawick, Scottish Borders), is pretty dire, due to the perpetual decline of the woollen industry, and it's just a case of waiting for a buyer. Fortunately we live in one of the more desirable areas, otherwise we could be dug in for a very long time. It appears we are reasonably close to a sale at the moment, and we are ever hopeful. 

Many people cannot quite work out why people of our age living in a rural area would want to retire to a city. We just tell them there are too many sheep to count here, and you end up awake all night!

Ah!  I was born in the Queen Elizabeth and lived most of my childhood in Kings Norton.  My mother was a GP in Kings Norton and she had many patients in Northfield, quite a few of whom worked at the Austin in Longbridge.  Sadly this is no more, the site is now largely occupied by an out of town shopping centre with its associated car parks.

My dad was an engineering director with Joseph Lucas at Great King St.  Another bit of British manufacturing history.  For some reason my mother thought he needed a business to occupy his spare time, so while he was away for a time in the sixties she bought a laundrette in Rubery.  Bloody mad.  

Even so, he continued to run it as a part time business for several years.
I was back that way earlier this year when I bought my first CBA from Fairdeal Accordions in Longbridge.  If you fetch up there then you should meet the chap who runs it.  He’s a nice bloke, retired, but still occupied with his accordion trading business and a dance band in the style of schlager bier Keller music.  He has a website which you could google.

Hi Chris,

House sold today, so we'll hopefully be down in paradise before Xmas. Scottish offers are binding and it is very rare that a deal falls through. Neighbours can't believe we shifted it so quick, but I suppose that's just the way it goes. 

I've spoken with Nigel before on the phone, and I almost bought a CBA from him several years ago. It had very strong Scottish tuning so I gave it a miss. I do have his address somewhere, and I'll not be very far away from him. We'll be down next week viewing houses, and they're all in Rubery. 
 
My wife cannot remember a laundry in Rubery. She lived there between 1986-1995. The "village" makes a welcome change from all the hustle and bustle of the city, and we enjoy runs out into the country. Our last dog loved the Lickeys and ran his socks off there. There used to be an ice cream van on The Beacon operated by a chap with a broad Glasgow accent, and he used to mesmerise the kids when they asked for an ice cream by saying "Waant a pokey hat?" (Would you like an ice cream cone/cornet?)

Some Glasgow people believe everybody in the world can understand their every nuance, and steadfastly refuse to alter their diction, even although they have never lived in Glasgow for decades. That never quite worked for me, and it has been 46 years since I lived in that area. 

Don't tell anybody, but Nicola Sturgeon gives us oldies with health issues £10,000 each to go and tax the English NHS system, and it's a great help (only kidding!).

(09-10-2019, 09:27 AM)Dingo40 Wrote:
John, something to help you to blend in. When you get there? Smile


Or this?   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nL5BBU5AVEk

(As far as the accent goes in these clips, I quite like it!)

Personally, I find the accent quite comprehensible. It must be the effect of all the British serials I’ve watched over the years. Smile

Dingo,

Those clips are pretty tame, but they are a decent approximation of what you would be likely to hear. 

The accent is often mocked by other UK types, but look up Liverpool in You Tube. 

It is a mixture of Lancashire, Irish, and Welsh, and you get such classics as this:-

"Der, dey, don' do da' down dere dese days dough, do dey?" (Er, they don't do that down there these days though do they?")

In all other parts of the world, "diesel" means a type of fuel. However, in Liverpool, it translates as "These will". Liverpudlians are colloquially known as "Scousers", and a Scouser will typically pick up some old bones at the butcher's and say "Diesel do de dog!" If you have followed my tuition implicitly you should be able to work that one out. 

The Liverpool accent shares it's passion for replacing "th" with "d" along with the accent found in north Dublin. 

The Glasgow accent is somewhat similar to the Irish accent from around the Belfast area. 

This clip is not very PC, but it is a parody of Indian and Pakistani immigrants remarking on the fact that if no work is available in Belfast you could get the "broo". The "broo" is slang for the old unemployment bureaux in both Belfast and Glasgow. They gave unemployed people benefits on condition that they were actively seeking work, something that would have been unthinkable in India or Pakistan.  

Ipanema beach used to be served by a trolleybus route from Belfast, until they moved it further along the road to Rio, and all the trolleybuses sank! 

There is accordion music in the clip, so it's not far off topic (much). 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPXdaTMMa2w&t=182s
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#16
Terry, good job on the song, and that rhythm box looks quite interesting! Playing with rhythm boxes can impose a lot of pressure, if one is not used to it, but you seem to have acclimated in a very short time!
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#17
what is that white suitcase with a speaker mounted in?? some sort of buskers amp?
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#18
Joss... Is old boombox vanity case..
In the seventies in the Brixton district of London it was a thing to mount speakers into suitcases / vanity cases etc and pop onto windowsills so the whole street could dance to ya tunes.
I scored this a couple of years back and we use as a busking amp or at small gigs to run simple backing tracks through. The guy that made them has quit now and his website is down bit his Facebook page still exists so you can see some of his beauts there...
https://www.facebook.com/VintageSoundMachine/
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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#19
Thanks for the link, Losthobos.
I paid it a visit: impressive! Smile
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#20
John... I vaguely remember Brum
https://youtu.be/l48RM-_RJrM
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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