Something a little bit different
#1
My sister has lived in Crete for some years, and a lot of Albanians work there seasonally in the bars and restaurants.

Never saw these two though, as they must have been too busy playing in the streets.

Not bad sounds for a 10 bob (cheap)  accordion:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hD7bBz40hRU
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#2
Thank you for the video, a very nice performance !
Just watched the video.
Performing on the street still is one of the best ways to promote the accordion as an ideal companion for musicians.
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#3
Thanks John. Very talented with all those quick runs and all, definitely has put a lot of hours in with that little accordion.
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#4
(01-10-2019, 04:09 PM)Tom Wrote: Thanks John. Very talented with all those quick runs and all, definitely has put a lot of hours in with that little accordion.

Hi Tom,

Hope his brothers weren't working 14 hour shifts in the bars, while he was sunbathing in the street!

Apparently the music is Albanian gypsy. There is another type of Albanian accordion music which more closely resembles mainstream Balkan styles. Don't think I've heard the accordion any time I've been to Crete, but it is still fairly popular in the Balkan areas of Greece, where they even play Greek music on them.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbweMebjVB0

Zoe is from the island of Samothrace in the Aegean Sea, and the island is part of Thrace. As far as I'm aware, Thrace, whilst recognised for centuries as being a fairly distinct region, has never been a country in its own right, and these days is spread across parts of Turkey (from Edirne to Istanbul), Bulgaria, and Greece.  

Nowadays there are a few fusion bands from all over Thrace who play music from each other's respective countries, something that would have been unthinkable until fairly recently. 

The Turkish influence in the clip will probably be apparent.

EDIT:- Couldn't mention Thrace without including a clip from one of its most famous accordionists, Peter Ralchev from Poibrene near Plovdiv, in Bulgarian Thrace. Great thing about folk music is that it is easy to play, isn't it?:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWNxX5Lrxbs
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#5
these two could fill a nice YT channel
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#6
I suspect that busking is a job, his technique showing those long shifts in he sun.

Interesting music, easy to admire the talent but difficult to understand.
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#7
It all broadens our musical horizons.
Thanks, John! Smile
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#8
(03-10-2019, 01:07 AM)Tom Wrote: I suspect that busking is a job, his technique showing those long shifts in he sun.

Interesting music, easy to admire the talent but difficult to understand.

Hi Tom,

Like most music from the Balkan area there is a degree of Turkish influence. Players often just play "taksim", or improvised solos, based around one of the many "oriental" scales. I've seen saz and Azeri guitar players play stuff they just make up as they go, for upwards of 5 minutes at a time. It would appear that the young man in the clip may be doing just that, but I wouldn't really know. It is a style I've never really come across before. 

All "Turkish" influenced music tends to be an acquired taste for westerners, and few can get into it. 

Having said that, one of the most famous lyra players on Crete is an Irishman named Ross Daly.

This guy, Nikos Papalexakis, from Rethymno, is one of the foremost makers of the lyra, which is the Cretan "national" instrument. My sister lives near him, and I bought one of his bouzoukis a few years ago. Great to get the genuine thing, although Nikos was born in Bishopbriggs, Glasgow, about 8 miles from where I used to live. So my sister has lived along the road from Nik twice in her lifetime!  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfBCkw--qPI 

The lyra, and other Cretan instruments, are definitely an acquired taste.
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#9
Very interesting! I want to go there.
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#10
(03-10-2019, 04:44 PM)Tom Wrote: Very interesting!  I want to go there.

Hi Tom,

If you are ever in Rethymno, go into the taverna in the main square, which is the last building on the right in this clip. Nik's workshop is just a few doors along, and if the workshop is closed the bar staff can usually get hold of him and ask him to meet you. There is also a little conventional music store a few doors further away from the square, which sells a whole load of Greek and Cretan musical instruments. They do take a very long μεσημεριανός ύπνος (siesta), and are often closed between lunch and about 1800 hours.

Nik also makes and plays the Cretan lute  

ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuwCKfdJD48

(04-10-2019, 12:36 AM)maugein96 Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 04:44 PM)Tom Wrote: Very interesting!  I want to go there.

Hi Tom,

If you are ever in Rethymno, go into the taverna in the main square, which is the last building on the right in this clip. Nik's workshop is just a few doors along, and if the workshop is closed the bar staff can usually get hold of him and ask him to meet you. There is also a little conventional music store a few doors further away from the square, which sells a whole load of Greek and Cretan musical instruments. They do take a very long μεσημεριανός ύπνος (siesta), and are often closed between lunch and about 1800 hours.

Nik also makes and plays the Cretan lute.  

ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuwCKfdJD48

You probably won't hear much accordion (or bouzouki) on Crete, except at rip off tourist venues. Places to avoid are Malia, and maybe Hersonissos and Stalis, unless watching drunk Euro kids is your bag. All of those places are actually quite pleasant during the day, but after dark it can get a bit rough. 
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#11
Thanks for the tips, John.
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