Scottish Slant 22
#1
This is a bagpipe march in 2/4 time called 'The Highland Wedding' by A. MacKay.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/p1cs6k2ngbgb34...4.mp3?dl=0
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#2
Great tune, immaculately played.
I play this on the pipes, but, of course, without the G sharps  Big Grin
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#3
Pipemajor.
Thanks.
The difficulty with a G natural on the pipes is that it is not quite the same as that on other instruments. There is no hard and fast rule, as far as I know, for accordionists (etc) playing pipe music to use either G natural or G sharp.
Tunes such as ‘Bonawe Highlanders’ and ‘Campbells’ Farewell to Redcastle’ seem at ease with G natural while other tunes feel better with G sharp.
 At one time most pipes seemed to be tuned to B flat. This made playing with other instruments, particularly brass, easy. (Amazing Grace, Mull of Kintyre etc).
A lot of tunings nowadays are somewhere in the C/C sharp area and much less accessible for other instruments.
Maybe the pipers are telling us something!
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#4
Great to hear!
I was fortunate enough to play at Celtic Connection in Glasgow and got to hear the National piping championships.
You play the March wonderfully well. Thanks for that.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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#5
(31-08-2019, 11:51 AM)Pipemajor Wrote: Great tune, immaculately played.
I play this on the pipes, but, of course, without the G sharps  Big Grin

(31-08-2019, 08:43 PM)boxplayer4000 Wrote: Pipemajor.
Thanks.
The difficulty with a G natural on the pipes is that it is not quite the same as that on other instruments. There is no hard and fast rule, as far as I know, for accordionists (etc) playing pipe music to use either G natural or G sharp.
Tunes such as ‘Bonawe Highlanders’ and ‘Campbells’ Farewell to Redcastle’ seem at ease with G natural while other tunes feel better with G sharp.
 At one time most pipes seemed to be tuned to B flat. This made playing with other instruments, particularly brass, easy. (Amazing Grace, Mull of Kintyre etc).
A lot of tunings nowadays are somewhere in the C/C sharp area and much less accessible for other instruments.
Maybe the pipers are telling us something!
I'm totally with you on the G/G sharp. In fact, a lot of pipe tunes would sound better on the pipes with a G sharp, but we have to play with the notes we have.
With regard to the tuning of pipes of pipes getting higher as time goes by. This has been brought about by competitions.
In the old days pipes were roughly in the key of A and military pipe bands used the drums tensioned by rope, and so they were limited in the tension they could get on the drum skins without splitting them.
With the advent of graded pipe band competitions, competed by virtual professional pipe bands with big sponsorship money for the top bands, the drums took a more important place in the band and , with synthetic skins and high tension drums, a more machine gun like sound could be produced. this led to pipe chanters being raised in pitch to blend in with the drums, and, over the years, the pitch got higher and higher. Of course, pipe makers were happy to comply as it was more trade for them and also a grade 1 pipe band winning a major competition playing their pipes was obviously very good publicity for them.
I'm not convinced that it did piping as a whole any great favours , but that's a whole new can of worms.
The pipe bands I play in  don't enter competitions as a matter of policy. We play for enjoyment of the music, not to practice 3 tunes 
to perfection for 6 months to play for 5 minutes in a competition.
Virtually all the tunes we play on the pipes, I also play on the CBA for my own pleasure, along with a piping pal who plays a D/G 
diatonic box, and we enjoy busking the old Shetland tunes. Of course a bottle of Glen Morangie helps Big Grin
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#6
Highland Wedding.
Eddy Yates.
Thanks. Precision is the order of the day when trying to play bagpipe music. Dotted notes, halved notes (snapped) etc. are all important. 
Pipemajor:
Thanks for your information on how pipe tuning has progressed. I hadn’t realised that the upward trend was due to drum development.
I thought, if I thought about it all, that the tuning up might have been an attempt to make the instrument stand out.
Some accordions, particularly Italian ones, I have noticed can be tuned up to a 1/5th of a tone above concert pitch but still nothing like the 3 tones on some bagpipes.
A blend of Shetland tunes and Glen Morangie sounds like the basis of a pleasant evening. I’ve been lucky enough over the years to work with Shetlanders and still socialise with their local gatherings.
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#7
A lot of my Bluegrass friends in the U.S. have been going to the Shetlands for years and they say there’s nothing like it (in a very positive way.)
I’ve been messing around with pipe tunes on my Tiger switch that has one set of reeds tuned up a fifth. If I get one presentable I’ll post it. It’s evocative if not authentic.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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