Dallape supermaestro (1856)
#1
I’ve been finding clips featuring the Dallape Supermaestro: nice rich sound!
Here’s an example ( bear with it as several different genres are exemplified Smile
(BTW, that should be 1956, not 1856)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAld0rZjauM
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#2
(15-08-2019, 11:01 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: I’ve been finding clips featuring the Dallape Supermaestro: nice rich sound!
Here’s an example ( bear with it as several different genres are exemplified Smile
(BTW, that should be 1956, not 1856)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAld0rZjauM

Seems like not many Dalape fans out there: is there something I should  know? Huh
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#3
(16-08-2019, 04:06 AM)Dingo40 Wrote:
(15-08-2019, 11:01 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: I’ve been finding clips featuring the Dallape Supermaestro: nice rich sound!
Here’s an example ( bear with it as several different genres are exemplified Smile
(BTW, that should be 1956, not 1856)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAld0rZjauM

Seems like not many Dalape fans out there: is there something I should  know? Huh

Perhaps this genre may be more appealing?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY5vkjqvPVc
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#4
There is nothing wrong with Dallapé accordions, they do have a wonderful sound, but you know how some cars are vaunted above others when there is in actuality not all that much that really separates them from their competition? I feel this is the Dallapé issue… a really good accordion, and a well known company, but that they never did anything that truly set them apart from the others in their day.
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#5
To date, I’ve probably played 15 accordions. I’ve probably played 6000 pianos, so this is a whole new wonderful world.  I like the sound of that Dallapé, and even the kind of Nash Rambler look.
I would love to see what kind of Music it inspires.
Accordion Gallery has one for sale for $4800. Quite beautiful.
https://www.accordiongallery.com/dallape-sm-31026.htm


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed), Hohner 1974 Melodica (Piano 36)
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#6
Here’s another:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1u7dnSSKSdw
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#7
This type of accordion seems to have a very nice L register. The rest is fine but not very different from other quality instruments. The clips seems to be from people trying to sell one of these accordions rather than perform wonderful music on them.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#8
(17-08-2019, 09:20 AM)debra Wrote: This type of accordion seems to have a very nice L register. The rest is fine but not very different from other quality instruments. The clips seems to be from people trying to sell one of these accordions rather than perform wonderful music on them.

You’re right about the advertising efforts but, other than Serbian traditional music there seems to be little else on YouTube, sorry  Undecided

(17-08-2019, 11:20 AM)Dingo40 Wrote:
(17-08-2019, 09:20 AM)debra Wrote: This type of accordion seems to have a very nice L register. The rest is fine but not very different from other quality instruments. The clips seems to be from people trying to sell one of these accordions rather than perform wonderful music on them.

You’re right about the advertising efforts but, other than Serbian traditional music there seems to be little else on YouTube, sorry  Sad
Thanks for responding! Smile
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#9
Factoid:
Before Dallape closed, Roland took sound samples and used them in their Special Edition FR8X
See:
https://www.roland.com/us/products/fr-8x_dallape/
Richard
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#10
They've been installed on mine since day 1 of my purchase, and I have gone through them all.  I am kind of neutral as to how I feel about their sound:

[Image: expansions.jpg]

They do make the basis of some interesting variations if you start with them and modify them to sound different.
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#11
Thanks Here’s a Dallapé being played on stage:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ur3DuJ_dUQ

(08-09-2019, 04:55 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Here’s a Dallapé being played on stage:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ur3DuJ_dUQ

And again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1NMaLMXkX0
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#12
I still wonder what is so special about Dallapé other than that they shutdown that prompted Roland to include that sound (and I don't know how well they did that as nobody is demonstrating the Dallapé sounds specifically, compared with an acoustic Dallapé accordion (not even in Roland's own advertising of the sound set).
And the demos on YouTube illustrate about every sound except the single M reed in cassotto, which is what is used a lot in practice in classical music. In contrast the L register is demonstrated quite extensively.
What would make an accordion exceptional is for it to have the best M sound. The Hohner Morino and Gola have (to my ears) a nicer M than L register whereas most Italian accordions (not including the Morino) have a nicer L than M register. This matters most for combination registers like MH for instance. (The M reed alone can often be replaced by L except when playing very high notes.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#13
(08-09-2019, 10:40 AM)debra Wrote: I still wonder what is so special about Dallapé other than that they shutdown that prompted Roland to include that sound (and I don't know how well they did that as nobody is demonstrating the Dallapé sounds specifically, compared with an acoustic Dallapé accordion (not even in Roland's own advertising of the sound set).

I've talked to several people, many were Dallape owners.  The reputation was not that they had magnificent sound, it was that basically they were nigh indestructible and held their tuning for decades.  Robust and low maintenance in those days was probably more important than having the best sounding accordion on the market.  Smile
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#14
(15-08-2019, 11:01 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: I’ve been finding clips featuring the Dallape Supermaestro: nice rich sound!
Here’s an example ( bear with it as several different genres are exemplified Smile
(BTW, that should be 1956, not 1856)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAld0rZjauM

Dallape certainly earned a premier place in Accordion Making history.
First and foremost, they enjoyed an exclusive relationship with the Vatican, 
and their most interesting accordions built for Liturgical use had many
unique and groundbreaking features. This relationship was largely why 
Dallape survived into the 21st Century.

Next, they had some rather unique reedmaking skills
(remember, their factory was apart from the mainstream industry)
Rather than a rectangular reed tongue, you will find a trapezoid shape
was used in special models.. also it is of note that Dallape successfully
hid their pre-war sets of handmade reeds from the Germans who 
stripped most Castlefidardo companies of their steel for making Bullets etc. 
so that after WW2 when accordion building resumed, although you
will find pot metal and repurposed pieces of god know what in most
accordions of that period, the Dallape accordions had the finest reeds
for pretty much another decade of manufacture while their rivals took
nearly as long to restore their reedmaking portion of the industry

If you fall in love with one of their accordions, be confident that if you invest some 
time and money into restoration, you will have a companion that will 
possibly still last your lifetime and be a pleasure to play

Ciao

Ventura
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#15
(08-11-2019, 09:22 AM)Ventura Wrote:
(15-08-2019, 11:01 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: I’ve been finding clips featuring the Dallape Supermaestro: nice rich sound!
Here’s an example ( bear with it as several different genres are exemplified Smile
(BTW, that should be 1956, not 1856)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAld0rZjauM

Dallape certainly earned a premier place in Accordion Making history.
First and foremost, they enjoyed an exclusive relationship with the Vatican, 
and their most interesting accordions built for Liturgical use had many
unique and groundbreaking features. ...

Ciao

Ventura

Hi Ventura,
Thanks for responding.

I wondered about the unusual names of some of their models (“Organ Tone”, “Cathedral “) Huh
What you say about their having a relationship with the Vatican would explain that. 
Thanks! Smile
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#16
Also, one of the Roland sets is called 'Liturgica' - I'd wondered about that
Richard
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#17
(08-11-2019, 10:43 AM)dunlustin Wrote: Also, one of the Roland sets is called 'Liturgica' - I'd wondered about that

there were special models built with as many as 7 treble reedsets.. 
tuned similar to an Organ (like the offset drawbar footages on a Hammond)

probably where Faithe D got her idea for the quint tuning
incorporated in the Tiger accordions !

and just because Guerrini and Dallape have (relatively recently) ceased modern manufacturing, 
well,
that does not necessarily mean they are completely out of business..

ciao

Ventura
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