Morino 1 palettes.
#1
Morino 1
I’m in the final stages of an overhaul of my Morino 1 (or 2+1 as it is known locally, probably because it has 2 treble couplers and 1 bass coupler). There is some hardening of the treble palette felt/leather and I am considering their renewal.
There’s differences from the more modern palettes in that the key rods attach to the palettes with leather ‘saddles’ laid onto a felt pad on top of the palette. The leather ‘saddle’ is shaped, close fitting and seems possible heat has been applied at the fitting stage.
Also the small round palettes, behind the main ones, serve the bass reeds only and are relatively inaccessible.
Has anyone done this palette overhaul and are there any thoughts on the matter?


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#2
To replace the pallets you only replace the felt+leather under the wooden parts, so the "leather saddles" do not matter.
All the pallets should be accessible quite easily once you take apart the complete keyboard. I have not done this on a Morino 1 (Jim D probably has) and it can be a bit of a puzzle as there are very many different keyboard assemblies that all come apart in different ways. But you do need to figure this out: you should never try to replace pallets without disassembling the whole keyboard assembly.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#3
Paul,
Thank you for your observations.
The Morino 1 is unusual in that all the bass reeds are on one reed block, at the rear, and have their own individual, small round palettes which operate a bit like the double palettes on a casottoed instrument.
The bass reeds are brought in and out of play, not by conventional slides in the base of the reed blocks but by a mechanism which engages the palettes by one of the two couplers on the edge of the keyboard. (The diatonic 3 row Shand Morino has the same arrangement).
Because there is similarity to casottoed instruments  I believe extra care will be required with choice of thickness of new leather/felt material to ensure that both palettes close fully when the key is released.
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#4
For your keyboard service you will have to remove the spindles to gain access to all your pallets.
If your not leaking badly you just might getaway with roughing up the leather faces with a med. sandpaper.
Owner & Operator "THE FISARMONICA SHOP" Chicopee, MA USA
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#5
(11-08-2019, 12:43 AM)boxplayer4000 Wrote: Paul,
Thank you for your observations.
The Morino 1 is unusual in that all the bass reeds are on one reed block, at the rear, and have their own individual, small round palettes which operate a bit like the double palettes on a casottoed instrument.
The bass reeds are brought in and out of play, not by conventional slides in the base of the reed blocks but by a mechanism which engages the palettes by one of the two couplers on the edge of the keyboard. (The diatonic 3 row Shand Morino has the same arrangement).
Because there is similarity to casottoed instruments  I believe extra care will be required with choice of thickness of new leather/felt material to ensure that both palettes close fully when the key is released.
That system you refer to (with the mechanism that engages the round palettes for the L reeds) is commonly referred to as a "declassement". And because of the position of the L reeds, hidden behind the keyboard and edge of the grille it gives the L reeds a bit more mellow sound, and the position of the other reeds ensures they all sound similar (as none of them are hidden behind keyboard, edge of grille and/or register mechanism on many accordions).
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#6
Morino Palettes continued:
I am receiving cautionary warnings about disturbing the bass palettes. Apparently their return springs are in a particularly inaccessible place.
A further rod/axle end has been noted at the rear/bottom of the keyboard. On the photo the usual keyboard axle is shown but behind it the head of another rod/axle (looks like brass) is can be seen. (Circled in red).
It seems likely it is associated with the bass palettes but I’m not sure 


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#7
(15-08-2019, 05:58 PM)boxplayer4000 Wrote: Morino Palettes continued:
I am receiving cautionary warnings about disturbing the bass palettes. Apparently their return springs are in a particularly inaccessible place.
A further rod/axle end has been noted at the rear/bottom of the keyboard. On the photo the usual keyboard axle is shown but behind it the head of another rod/axle (looks like brass) is can be seen. (Circled in red).
It seems likely it is associated with the bass palettes but I’m not sure 

The second  rod/axle is needed because of the declassement.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#8
This is a recording of the Morino 1 with a Tascam recorder placed about 6 inches (150mm) from the keyboard. The palette sound is barely audible albeit it is a fairly slow waltz tune.
It's on the LM and MMM reeds.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/10nc1lkhg5rva0...8.m4a?dl=0
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#9
(16-08-2019, 05:19 PM)boxplayer4000 Wrote: This is a recording of the Morino 1 with a Tascam recorder placed about 6 inches (150mm) from the keyboard. The palette sound is barely audible albeit it is a fairly slow waltz tune.
It's on the LM and MMM reeds.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/10nc1lkhg5rva0...8.m4a?dl=0

You have nothing to worry about. Many new accordions already have more pallet noise. My still fairly new bayan certainly has more pallet noise.  For an old accordion this recording is still very good. Don't touch it!
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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