FINGERING
#1
In viewing chromatic scales on the accordion, I see a variety of fingering being used.
I  would be interested in opinions, and learning more about recommended fingering techniques
for performing chromatic scales on a 41 key treble keyboard.
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#2
I'm assuming you're talking about chromatic scales in the right hand? On a piano accordion?

Fingerings in that case are, like most RH accordion fingerings, based on what the "correct" fingering would be on a regular piano. In the case of chromatic scales, however, there's not as much of a universal consensus as there is with non-chromatic scales.

For example:  http://www.pianisttopianist.com/?p=486

In published accordion music that supplies fingerings, I feel like that first one is the most-common version I see:
  • 1 on white keys that are between two black keys or the lowest of two adjacent white keys
  • 3 on all black keys
  • 2 on the highest of two adjacent white keys
I might do some modifications to the this at the top of it, if I know the scale is ending or turning around. For example, I'd typically do C chromatic scale like this:

13 13 123 13 1234

But other fingerings have their merits. YMMV.

(By the way, check out Frosiini's "La Mariposita" if you want a nice chromatic workout!)
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#3
(08-07-2019, 10:05 PM)JeffJetton Wrote: I'm assuming you're talking about chromatic scales in the right hand? On a piano accordion?

Fingerings in that case are, like most RH accordion fingerings, based on what the "correct" fingering would be on a regular piano. In the case of chromatic scales, however, there's not as much of a universal consensus as there is with non-chromatic scales.

For example:  http://www.pianisttopianist.com/?p=486

In published accordion music that supplies fingerings, I feel like that first one is the most-common version I see:
  • 1 on white keys that are between two black keys or the lowest of two adjacent white keys
  • 3 on all black keys
  • 2 on the highest of two adjacent white keys
I might do some modifications to the this at the top of it, if I know the scale is ending or turning around. For example, I'd typically do C chromatic scale like this:

13 13 123 13 1234

But other fingerings have their merits. YMMV.

(By the way, check out Frosiini's "La Mariposita" if you want a nice chromatic workout!)

Jeff:
Thank you.
I  appreciate the tips.
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#4
(08-07-2019, 11:31 PM)Chickers Wrote:
(08-07-2019, 10:05 PM)JeffJetton Wrote: (By the way, check out Frosiini's "La Mariposita" if you want a nice chromatic workout!)


La Mariposita - You can say that again!

There's a great book that discusses many aspects of accordion fingering (PA and stradella bass) by Bob Smith. PM me if you are interested and I will give you his contact info.

Good luck!
Petosa AM-1100 LMMH, Borsini “Lars Ek Nostalgic” LMMM, "Nunziola" LMMH
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#5
There used to be strictly laid down rules on fingering particularly is following tutor books for exams and grades.. In the real world the most suitable fingering witll to a large extent depend on the tune being played or even on the particular part of a particular tune being played.

A good basic starting point for scale practice is (fingers) 123 thumb under 45678 going up the scale 87654 3rd finger overover going down the scale. These enable 8 notes to be played fluently with 5 fingers which is all we have got! IN other words the first 'chunk' of a scale is played with 3 fingers and the second 'chunk' is played with 5 fingers and the process is reversed coming down a scale.

Whatever pattern of fingering is used the important thing is not to run out of fingers!

george
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