Dutch Accordion shop on Ebay
#1
Hiya,

I've been following an eBay accordion vendor for several weeks but it's based in Holland so you won't find their items (from the UK) unless you scroll down to the "items from eBay international sellers", so I though I'd mention it here.

They put items up for 7-day auction on Sunday evenings, 44 so far today, and their stock is usually quite interesting.  I've got no idea where they get it all from.
They even had an Ottavianelli 96 bass musette up a few weeks back (went for £1300).

Here's a link for whatever they're listing:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/Muziekhandel-...p=10&rt=nc


I have no connection with them, I just like window shopping on a Sunday evening, and of course all the usual eBay warnings apply.

Gareth.
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#2
he's a little too far from me for a casual visit

seems like he partners with someone across the border in Germany
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#3
He must have connections to get that number of accordions, or a very fast bicycle.

I don't see any reserve auction prices so in theory you could get something for 1 euro (+ postage),
unfortunately all the good stuff goes for realistic prices as far as I can tell, but I'm no expert.

Still it's interesting to see many makes I hadn't heard of which people seem to rate.  And they're also selling a lot of accordions,
maybe some are bought by the known shops for servicing and resale.
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#4
All the chromatics currently listed are B system....  Cry
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#5
Yep,

I am slightly interested in a cheap C system for learning.
But I did a search on completed listings and there are 21 B-griff and no C-griff.
There was a Roland Fr3 sB that went for £975, but I don't call that cheap.

I'm guessing C-griff just isn't popular in that region.
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#6
(08-04-2019, 10:29 PM)Glug Wrote: Yep,

I am slightly interested in a cheap C system for learning.
But I did a search on completed listings and there are 21 B-griff and no C-griff.
There was a Roland Fr3 sB that went for £975, but I don't call that cheap.

I'm guessing C-griff just isn't popular in that region.

Gareth,

Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, and the extreme north of France around Lille and Valenciennes are all B system strongholds. 

Cheap C system not easily come by in UK, especially if being sold by a dealer. You might be able to pick up a cheap 4 row as nobody in the UK can be bothered learning to play them. Just needs a bit more discipline and work in the early stages, and you'll wonder why they bother making 5 row boxes. 

I do believe that C system 5 row is easier for converts from PA, but those of us who learned to play on three rows only have no use for 5 row boxes. You can do the whole lot comfortably with 4 rows, and even then the 4th row buttons don't get all that much action. I've never played a PA, as those raised black keys do my head in. 

Good luck, but my guess is your base will be £600 for a reasonable 5 row.
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#7
Cheers,
I was fairly sure it was a regional thing.

I'm only really interested at the moment because I'll always wonder if I should be playing CBA instead of PA, and there's only one way to know Smile
And I've seen that C-system is supposed to be easier for ex piano players, but other than that I've got no preference.

Is there any other reason to go C rather than B in the UK ?
Just a thought: world wide which is most popular, C or B ?
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#8
C-system versus B-system (and the many others) is mainly a regional thing, but 1) not stable forever and 2) not bound by country borders. In Belgium there is a lot of B-system (as well as "do-2" accordions) but the southwest is all C-system (leaning towards what is popular in France I guess). In the Netherlands it used to be all B-system but nowadays there are more and more C-system players (but their accordions are not old enough to be sold for little money). My guess is that the reason is that PA players who became professional and learned convertor all took a C-system convertor, and when they later discovered the button accordion they wanted C-system on their button accordion as well. A lot of the younger accordion players in the Netherlands now learned it from these converted teachers so they too start on C-system. So the dutch "market" of button accordion players consists mostly of younger C-system players and old B-system players, and this is then reflected in what you find on the market for used accordions...
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#9
(11-04-2019, 10:34 AM)Glug Wrote: Cheers,
I was fairly sure it was a regional thing.

I'm only really interested at the moment because I'll always wonder if I should be playing CBA instead of PA, and there's only one way to know Smile
And I've seen that C-system is supposed to be easier for ex piano players, but other than that I've got no preference.

Is there any other reason to go C rather than B in the UK ?
Just a thought: world wide which is most popular, C or B ?

As Paul says, there seems to be a shift in some places from B towards C, and I'm not really up to date with how that's going, as I've never lived in mainland Europe. 

Unfortunately, I cannot really answer the other points you raised, as my knowledge of such matters is pretty sketchy. As you say the only way to work out whether CBA is for you is to get your hands on one and see for yourself.

If you find a B system box in the UK buy a lottery ticket the same day, as there aren't very many of them.
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#10
Sounds like I'd better wait for a cheap C-griff that needs some fixing then Smile

Though this shop sold an old 5 row B-griff 'parts only' for £49 + £34 postage last month.
And a Settimio Soprani retro 5 row 'needs overhaul' for £113 + £34 postage.
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#11
(11-04-2019, 04:44 PM)Glug Wrote: Sounds like I'd better wait for a cheap C-griff that needs some fixing then Smile
...

Careful because "some fixing" can easily cost more than the economic value of the accordion after fixing.
If you care to look for dutch sources, have a look at marktplaats.nl in the accordions section.
There are occasionally some intersting deals to be done on C-griff accordions.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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