Bellows settings and volume settings FR-4x
#1
I'm one of those people who keep my FR-4x on extra heavy and the air ring closed as tight as possible.  I find that I can make very subtle force changes with my left hand to get the dynamics I need and want, and I have the added advantage of not having to move the bellows too far.  The only thing I had to practice just a little with these settings was decrescendo, which can be much too sudden the first time you try it.  Am I able to get maximum volume that way?  I demonstrated it for my teacher (another advocate of my bellows settings) and he said that the most volume I could produce that way with the internal speakers and the volume set about 118 was about the same as the maximum volume obtainable on an acoustic.  I'm satisfied that he's correct.

However, there is a lot of controversy out there, regarding this topic, on another forum.  Somebody even said that it's nonsense to set up the FR-4x that way; that you need the lightest setting and a couple of clicks open on the air ring, and he believed that setting it the way I do would contribute to shoulder pain.  I am NOT getting shoulder pain, even with an old rotator cuff injury in that left shoulder.  In fact, I believe that the wider range of motion associated with lighter settings is what would contribute to shoulder pain.  

There is another philosophy:  the best settings are the ones you get used to.

I'd like to set up an informal poll on this topic.  However, I'd like to exclude FR-8x players from the poll, or at least warn me, if you play an FR-8x exclusively, since, unlike the FR-4x the FR8x has no air ring.

Please take a minute, you FR-4x players, to tell me what you have found to be the best settings.

Thanks.

Alan Sharkis
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#2
I don’t own or play any Roland V Accordion, however, my thoughts on this are as follows:

You seem to have found settings that you are comfortable with, produce effects you want, isn’t hurting you or your machine, and your teacher likes it to boot. Why mess with it. It’s not broke. Don't fix it.
Cordially, Tony
Artisto, Italian, LMM, 41/120, PA
Warning: Only speaks/understands American English
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#3
(05-04-2019, 10:18 PM)StargazerTony Wrote: I don’t own or play any Roland V Accordion, however, my thoughts on this are as follows:

You seem to have found settings that you are comfortable with, produce effects you want, isn’t hurting you or your machine, and your teacher likes it to boot. Why mess with it. It’s not broke. Don't fix it.

Not messing.  Just curious about how many agree and how many  disagree. Smile
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#4
Well Alan;
if your seeking opinions & recommendations on Roland bellows control here goes  --

To start with, I was working for a Roland Distributor when the first  "V" models were introduced in 1994  for the US
.market.
Roland was making a FR-1,  FR-2, FR-5 and top of the line FR-7 
In the time not only did I perform &repair the's models , I purchased a new FR-7.
I played my FR-7 until the FR-7x was introduced I felt the flash drive option was what I needed. and I upgraded.
I sold my FR-7 to a gent that still plays it today.
In these past years, I have repaired & performed with all the models including the the new FR-4x.


Well so much for my history with "V" accordions - I hope this will help  --

All the Pro's I know (Including myself)  use "V' accordions with bellows set on (Extra Heavy).
Owner & Operator "THE FISARMONICA SHOP" Chicopee, MA USA
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#5
I must be a little different though I am neither agreeing nor disagreeing. I use heavy just so that I don't have to work as hard, there is no loss in dynamics between heave and extra heavy, just the amount of effort exerted to push-pull. It's not all that different.
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#6
(06-04-2019, 01:38 AM)JIM D. Wrote: Well Alan;
if your seeking opinions & recommendations on Roland bellows control here goes  --

To start with, I was working for a Roland Distributor when the first  "V" models were introduced in 1994  for the US
.market.
Roland was making a FR-1,  FR-2, FR-5 and top of the line FR-7 
In the time not only did I perform &repair the's models , I purchased a new FR-7.
I played my FR-7 until the FR-7x was introduced I felt the flash drive option was what I needed. and I upgraded.
I sold my FR-7 to a gent that still plays it today.
In these past years, I have repaired & performed with all the models including the the new FR-4x.


Well so much for my history with "V" accordions - I hope this will help  --

All the Pro's I know (Including myself)  use "V' accordions with bellows set on (Extra Heavy).
Hello Jim,

I guess I can count what you said as a vote for extra heavy (multiple votes if you give me the number of professionals -- no names, please.)  But the fact that you said that professionals use extra heavy leads me to believe that the guys who advocate light on that other forum aren't really pros or have been given some bad advice.  I kind of suspected as much.

(06-04-2019, 06:23 PM)JerryPH Wrote: I must be a little different though I am neither agreeing nor disagreeing.  I use heavy just so that I don't have to work as hard, there is no loss in dynamics between heave and extra heavy, just the amount of effort exerted to push-pull.  It's not all that different.

Hello Jerry, 

Are you talking about the FR-4x or the FR-8x?  I hope I made it clear that bellows settings are essentially different on the two accordions because the FR-8x doesn't have an air wheel.  But, if you're talking about the FR-4x, I'll take it as a vote for heavy (as opposed to extra-heavy.)
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#7
No, its definitely an 8X. Smile Sorry about that.
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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