And now for something different!
#1
Soul music (for some)  Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ELs8D9RmYE
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#2
(03-04-2019, 09:09 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Soul music (for some)  Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ELs8D9RmYE

Hi Dingo,

Scandinavian accordion can be pleasant to listen to for a short while, but most of the repertoire is pretty staid and sober, like the people. Scottish accordion is much the same, except the people aren't as sober as the music. Must be the dark nights and the cold weather, although for some older foot tapping Norwegians that will indeed be soul music, even if it is being played by a Swede in your clip! 

IMHO the best accordion entertainment in both Scandinavia and Scotland is when players branch out into more eclectic music, and the Danes are the most laid back about what is acceptable material at the local "harmonika klub". 

In keeping with the theme, here is Søren Brix, a Dane, playing a Brazilian tune in Sweden! I hadn't forgotten Norway. The guitarist is from there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFyNVJQLCbY
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#3
(03-04-2019, 05:36 PM)maugein96 Wrote:
(03-04-2019, 09:09 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Soul music (for some)  Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ELs8D9RmYE


In keeping with the theme, here is Søren Brix, a Dane, playing a Brazilian tune in Sweden! I hadn't forgotten Norway. The guitarist is from there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFyNVJQLCbY

To paraphrase George Orwell, “All music is good, just that some music is ‘gooder’ than other!” (For some people)
All good! Smile

It’s simply amazing the numbers of ways those 12 little notes can be arranged! ?
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#4
I like the darker tonalities and complex rhythms of Scandinavian fiddle tunes; I suppose an older form (than accordion repertoire). I procured a hardingfele recently, to which henceforth all my other fiddling has taken a back seat..

Concerning accordions, I like more of the minor tonalities and more plaintive qualities in slower tunes on diatonic and CBA.

But I'm biased. I'm more of the gypsy aesthetic with an accordion.
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#5
Ah! soul music indeed!

george
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#6
Maugein:

Thank you for posting the Brazilian tune. Somewhat ironically, two of my favorite musics are the subjects at hand Smile

I don't know whether Hermeto has been posted here yet
https://youtu.be/jxh6gbohJLs

I love Brazilian accordion.

*Btw, egberto's cavaquinho is among my favorites: https://youtu.be/Fwy9wUl1hpY
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#7
(10-04-2019, 04:14 AM)cat Wrote: Maugein:

Thank you for posting the Brazilian tune.  Somewhat ironically, two of my favorite musics are the subjects at hand Smile  

I don't know whether Hermeto has been posted here yet
https://youtu.be/jxh6gbohJLs

I love Brazilian accordion.  

*Btw, egberto's cavaquinho is among my favorites:  https://youtu.be/Fwy9wUl1hpY

Hi Cat,

I used to post clips of Brazilian and other South American accordion on here fairly regularly, and we once had several South American members who kindly explained the differences between the different styles. However, for some reason the music was generally not very well received on the forum, probably because it isn't promoted very much outside of South America, and the tunes take a fair bit of technique to be able to play well. 

Also, a lot of members don't really like listening to virtuosi, but I never worry about whether a tune will be beyond my playing capabilities. I'm a virtuoso listener, but decided a few years ago that playing is best left to those who know what they're doing. I would say that Hermeto is one in a million in that respect, and most people would never even contemplate trying to emulate him. The clip you posted adequately demonstrates that.

Søren Brix is a little known Danish world class virtuoso who plays all styles. Most of his renderings of French musette are far better than the originals, and his jazz, swing, and Latin numbers are outstanding.  

I enjoyed the clip of Cavaquinho. South America is jam packed full of interesting stringed instruments, and I used to listen to a lot of charango music from Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru. I started out too late on accordion to be able to make much of it, but have been playing guitar since I was about 11 years old, and feel more "natural" playing fretted stringed instruments. 

I try and maintain some sort of interest in the accordion, but my musical tastes don't coincide with many other forum members, so I tend to drop out from time to time. 

Thanks for the clips. Great stuff!
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#8
Great (virtuoso) stuff, thanks guys. Post away, dear Maugein, I for one like the Brazilian stuff, especially the more laid back forró pé de serra and gaúchas styles. Yes, difficult to play, but I do not aspire to virtuosity so I'm covered.
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#9
To me, these (Brazilian dance rhythms) are folk forms and highly accessible. I spent a lot of time as a drummer playing in clubs, and since giving that up the accordion has been the most gratifying for assuaging my rhythmic impetus. I was heavily into flamenco guitar but I wore out my wrists/thumbs; and i still need something to drum my hands/fingers upon.

I find accordion the perfect little machine on which to execute a variety of music, and particularly for strong rhythmic forms such as Latin. All the other instruments I play are less versatile for performing. I used to schlep around bags full of stringed instruments - even hammered dulcimers and lever harps - but these days I'm just using accordion.

I play cumbia and baiao (on accordion) and just groove and improvise, as well as blues, boogie-woogie, balkan, some scots/Irish pipe tunes, etc.
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#10
It took me a while to integrate the baiao (vaneira) bass rythem with its dotted 8th and 16th on the first beat but I like it!
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#11
Yes, I find it irresistible! Smile

I used to study deploying samba and various Latin percussion on the drum kit. Since I don't drum anymore, doing it on accordion is fun (my main hobby lately). I'm unequivocally addicted to rhythm - I think I'm just a dancer seeking gratification.
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#12
Parabéns, boa sorte!
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#13
Well,

It started off as Scandinavian, so I'll try and get back on that theme with a Danish polka to commemorate the old inn in Vejle, Jutland, which was known as the Trædballehus, until it burned down in 1954.

Don't think I've seen any Danish folk music on here, but these guys are probably up there with the best in Denmark. 

The Danes, in keeping with their Scandinavian neighbours, don't tend to use musette tuning. The Danes were using swing tuning on their "harmonikaer" as far back as the late 40s.   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJFv3S-RF38

Second clip is a Swedish waltz (sorry about the sound in places). Midnight Sun over Pajala (not paella!). Pajala is a small town in north Sweden.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ol2tSA0Ofz8

Here is something a bit different, with a French theme, but a Danish title "In love in Copenhagen":-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMOxlsEWKdc
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#14
Thanks for all the links! As Duke Ellington said, “There are only two kinds of music...good and bad.”
These were all good!
That said, anything you enjoy playing is good.
All the best,

(03-04-2019, 05:36 PM)Lmaugein96 Wrote:
(03-04-2019, 09:09 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Soul music (for some)  Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ELs8D9RmYE

Hi Dingo,

Scandinavian accordion can be pleasant to listen to for a short while, but most of the repertoire is pretty staid and sober, like the people. Scottish accordion is much the same, except the people aren't as sober as the music. Must be the dark nights and the cold weather, although for some older foot tapping Norwegians that will indeed be soul music, even if it is being played by a Swede in your clip! 

IMHO the best accordion entertainment in both Scandinavia and Scotland is when players branch out into more eclectic music, and the Danes are the most laid back about what is acceptable material at the local "harmonika klub". 

In keeping with the theme, here is Søren Brix, a Dane, playing a Brazilian tune in Sweden! I hadn't forgotten Norway. The guitarist is from there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFyNVJQLCbY

Huh?!? You must be joking, man. I think the word “dour” was invented for Scotland! I’m joking now. But any people anywhere have the same range of expression and emotion. I love the little rhythmic twists and ornaments that differ from culture to culture. Save us from the world that says there is a “right” way to do things. Open up our hearts, like your friends in the harmonica klub, right? Thanks for listening and playing.

(10-04-2019, 04:14 AM)cat Wrote: Maugein:

Thank you for posting the Brazilian tune.  Somewhat ironically, two of my favorite musics are the subjects at hand Smile  

I don't know whether Hermeto has been posted here yet
https://youtu.be/jxh6gbohJLs

I love Brazilian accordion.  

*Btw, egberto's cavaquinho is among my favorites:  https://youtu.be/Fwy9wUl1hpY
Thanks for that! Yes. Hermeto is a Saint!
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed)
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#15
(11-04-2019, 06:15 PM)Eddy Yates Wrote: I think the word “dour” was invented for Scotland!

Dour - late Middle English (originally Scots): probably from Scottish Gaelic dúr ‘dull, obstinate, stupid’, perhaps from Latin durus ‘hard’.

I suppose a plurality if not majority of the tunes I've learned on my own initiative, I've learn from Norwegian squeezebox performances on youtube. Mostly diatonic - and that's what he's playing here, I'm pretty sure. Compare for example to Min Första Komposition, which has the same time and background percussion. (Note beat 2 is just a hair longer.) In Norsk Bondvals, he has this extra type of articulation that I suppose is done with the bellows, that I guess may be beyond the grasp of a chromatic accordion.

For my contribution, here's more of those dour Norwegians playing a tune I think may be particularly popular in "session" settings like this, Telemarkshuldra. I think the "yahoo" is obligatory.
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#16
Concerning rhythm, and diatonic boxes...this is something that I find compelling in Scandinavian forms - old dance forms, songs, calls, airs, etc ). The diatonic (/bisonoric) box facilitates expressive syncopation - characteristic of Scand.

Don't know if I should/not post diatonic examples, but.. https://youtu.be/giaQ6K0roBE
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#17
(12-04-2019, 05:37 PM)cat Wrote: Concerning rhythm, and diatonic boxes...this is something that I find compelling in Scandinavian forms - old dance forms, songs, calls, airs, etc ).   The diatonic (/bisonoric) box facilitates expressive syncopation - characteristic of Scand.

Don't know if I should/not post diatonic examples, but..  https://youtu.be/giaQ6K0roBE

The two row Norwegian Torader (pronounced Tworraderr), is the diatonic folk box in Norway, and is probably so called to differentiate between the more usual five row B system CBA. Almost all accordions in Norway are dry tuned. 

Thing is a lot of CBA players just play "torader" tunes on their big 5 rows, and it is often tempting to wonder why they bother carting those big 5 row boxes around. 

Then you come across this sort of thing by Toralf Tollefsen, and the "øre" finally drops. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNuHLePcFac&t=15s

Toralf Tollefsen played a C system CBA, but he lived in Glemmen, close to the border with Sweden where C system is preferred over B. 

He played his C system box with his hand in a similar position to Norwegian B system players, making much use of the inside three rows. He was acknowledged as being on of the best ever exponents of CBA accordion.  

This is one of his more light-hearted compositions:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muN8vTemmjY

The player, Håvard Svensrud is one of the top contemporary Norwegian players. He's now in his mid 40s.

With regard to Svensrud's bass arrangement, as far as I'm aware he has always played free bass, and I believe the asymmetric bass buttons at the top allow him to play single bass notes without a converter. I've been wrong before, and these days he just uses normal stradella with a converter. 

Anybody into classical with a bit of an oomph should also check out Øivind Farmen. He has the two outside rows of his bass buttons stepped so that he can use his left thumb on the outside three rows of bass buttons. It should be possible after about 20 minutes of practice (on each button!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RlJ4FilITc
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#18
Thanks for all of these links. I'm a quarter Norwegian and have been there for approximately 9 hours, having played a concert in Oslo and immediately left for England, so all of this information is very welcome. I'll get there again some day.
Although I play a PA, I like listening to the CBA players and trying to emulate the inflections that aren't natural to a PA player.
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed)
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#19
(13-04-2019, 12:18 AM)Eddy Yates Wrote: Thanks for all of these links. I'm a quarter Norwegian and have been there for approximately 9 hours, having played a concert in Oslo and immediately left for England, so all of this information is very welcome. I'll get there again some day.
Although I play a PA, I like listening to the CBA players and trying to emulate the inflections that aren't natural to a PA player.

Hi Eddy,

My sister and my niece currently live in Norway, but they weren't born there. There is now a grandson who is Norwegian, and another on the way, so there are three generations of my family living there, way up near the Arctic Circle (Polarsirkel). I spent a few months in Arctic Norway in 1975/6 in the UK military during the so-called Cold War, but accordions weren't really on the agenda then.  

I have a few Danish friends, and we used to visit both Denmark and Sweden fairly regularly when the ferries were still running to there from the UK. My DNA suggests that I may be descended from the Angles, one of three Danish tribes who invaded Britain. However US genealogy categorises them as "Germanic peoples", but don't tell the Danes that! 

I've never really been into Scandinavian accordion much, although recognise the talents of many of the players. I have the same issue in Scotland. A lot of great players, but I just can't get to grips with the music or the tuning of the accordions at all. 

Norway is a fascinating place, although it is one of the most expensive Scandinavian destinations. The folk music is relatively little known outside of Norway, much the same as such music is in the rest of the world, but has a reputation for being a bit starchy. Swedish, Icelandic, and Finnish music are much the same, but the Danes are a bit more eclectic in their repertoire, probably because the country is part of mainland Europe. 

The Danes are also pretty keen on jazz, and are more amenable to incorporate other elements into their folk music, or so it would appear. Their general attitude is a bit more laid back than their more stolid northern cousins, and IMHO their music is all the better for that. There are several fusion Danish bands, few of which feature accordions, but the music knows no national boundaries.

Suffice to say that a lot of surprises exist in contemporary Danish music, such as here when Jacob Venndt decides that double bass is a great prop for playing jazz harmonica. Need to be careful as "harmonika" is the Danish word for accordion. Doesn't matter as reeds are being punished regardless in the Dixieland Gypsy Band from Holstebro! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNO35NVqzds
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#20
I learned this Hopparen the other night (solo hdgfl). Here it's with accordian accompaniment: https://youtu.be/21-EZ6UBDKA

Which, btw, you don't often hear hdgfl with accordian - the temperaments often clash. Perhaps this is a somewhat more modern treatment.
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