To warm you up on a cold northern morning
#1
Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR_V07fLxeo
Reply
#2
Samba carnival time on my kitchen now...
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
Reply
#3
(07-02-2019, 10:46 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR_V07fLxeo

Hi Dingo. Excellent. Although when I tried it Jeanette did the trick, but I was left with an accordion I didn't want!
Reply
#4
(07-02-2019, 12:30 PM)maugein96 Wrote:
(07-02-2019, 10:46 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR_V07fLxeo

Hi Dingo. Excellent. Although when I tried it Jeanette did the trick, but I was left with an accordion I didn't want!

Not sure what accordion you mean John ?
Would the accordion being played by Jeanette be a Hohner Tango V ?

Thanks for responding all! Smile
Reply
#5
BTW, I believe the title translates to “Gobstopper” in English Smile
Reply
#6
(08-02-2019, 06:29 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: BTW, I believe the title translates to “Gobstopper” in English Smile

Dingo,

Looks like I failed there (again!). My quip was meant to convey the fact that when I woke up Jeanette had gone but had left without her accordion.

With regard to what the accordion is I have no idea whatsoever. Brazil is full of ancient PAs. I've never played any type of instrument with a piano keyboard and cannot tell one PA from another. Looks like a Hohner grille right enough. 

You're probably right about the title. Jaw smasher was as close as I could get. Brazilian Portuguese was described as a language of it's own by a Portuguese work colleague of mine. In Portugal people are often incredulous if you try and speak to them in Portuguese. The Spaniards on holiday there make no effort at all to speak it, as they know Spanish is taught as a second language in Portugal. Consequently few casual visitors bother to learn it. 

In the Azores (a group of islands in the Atlantic about 1000 miles west of Lisbon), PA still seems to be quite popular, although the music is very much of a local nature and I must admit I'm not very keen on it.

However, when it is given the South American treatment it takes on a new concept altogether. The band are from the Portuguese mainland, but are no longer on the go.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwzLpRso1Eo
Reply
#7
(08-02-2019, 09:38 AM)Imaugein96 Wrote:
(08-02-2019, 06:29 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: BTW, I believe the title translates to “Gobstopper” in English Smile

Dingo,

Looks like I failed there (again!). My quip was meant to convey the fact that when I woke up Jeanette had gone but had left without her accordion.

With regard to what the accordion is I have no idea whatsoever. Brazil is full of ancient PAs. I've never played any type of instrument with a piano keyboard and cannot tell one PA from another. Looks like a Hohner grille right enough. 
All good, John! Smile 
I did kind of get the joke Smile .
I thought I recognised the model & make of Jeanette’s accordion only because one was recently for sale at a pawnbroker’s hereabouts, recently! Smile
Reply
#8
I thought I recognised the model & make of Jeanette’s accordion only because one was recently for sale at a pawnbroker’s hereabouts, recently! Smile

Pawnbrokers are very few and far between in rural Scotland. We did have one here for a few years, but the guy lost his licence for selling stolen property. We do have a handful of music shops that may have one or two PA boxes in stock, but if you play a French CBA you're now probably best to drive there and have a look. I've bought 4 French boxes in the UK, as there was a time when they were being imported sporadically, but those days are long gone.
Reply
#9
(08-02-2019, 04:26 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Would the accordion being played by Jeanette be a Hohner Tango V ?

It's a Hohner Tango III M from somewhere in the 1950's. The Tango V M has 13 treble and 6 bass couplers. The Tango III M has only 9 and 3.
Reply
#10
(08-02-2019, 11:52 AM)Dingo40 has Morne Wrote:
(08-02-2019, 04:26 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Would the accordion being played by Jeanette be a Hohner Tango V ?

It's a Hohner Tango III M from somewhere in the 1950's. The Tango V M has 13 treble and 6 bass couplers. The Tango III M has only 9 and 3.

Thanks Morne! Smile
As I remember, the model I viewed was an LMMM, however, of the 13 treble couplers several were repeats, thus reducing the number of actual effective choices.
I’ve noticed this “trick” on various other instruments and makes and can’t help thinking of it as mere “puffery” intended to deceive the public. Sad
Reply
#11
(07-02-2019, 10:46 AM)Dingo40 Wrote: Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR_V07fLxeo

Ok
Reply


Forum Jump: